Reformed Realtor turned Tech Investor.
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Introduction to VGG16 | What is VGG16?

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VGG16 proved to be a significant milestone in the quest of mankind to make computers “see” the world. A lot of effort has been put into improving this ability under the discipline of Computer Vision (CV) for a number of decades. VGG16 is one of the significant innovations that paved the way for several innovations […]

The post Introduction to VGG16 | What is VGG16? appeared first on GreatLearning Blog: Free Resources what Matters to shape your Career!.

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elty
334 days ago
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“That’s Fascinating!” with Barry Ritholtz

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Josh and I were discussing our 2020 bet about January 20, 2021, and he surprised me with some help on my segue game . . .


 

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The post “That’s Fascinating!” with Barry Ritholtz appeared first on The Big Picture.

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elty
568 days ago
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Listen Up

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Atmospheric electronic, laidback hip-hop and robotic rock in this week's music MF DOOM: Lunch Break A new song on the FlyLo FM station featured in the updated Grand Theft Auto V, “Lunch Break” opens with MF DOOM’s inimitable voice over a beat by Flying Lotus (aka Steven Ellison, founder of Brainfeeder). The laidback tune is accompanied on the station by music from Dilla, Thundercat, Freddie …
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elty
596 days ago
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The best chickpea-based pastas and rice

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Chickpea alternatives for your favorite dishes.
Chickpea alternatives for your favorite dishes. (Amazon/)

It used to be difficult to find tasty alternatives to pasta made from wheat—especially if you’re looking for a range of pasta types. Luckily, there are tons of great tasting legume-based options these days. Chickpeas are an excellent flour alternative for pasta, thanks to its high protein and low carb content, along with a surprising amount of dietary fiber. It all adds up to a pasta that’s better for you and gives you more energy.

Here are some of our favorites.

Easy prep.
Easy prep. (Amazon/)

Banza is known for its excellent texture and cook time, more similar to regular rice than most other brands. With 11 grams of protein and 5 grams of fiber in each serving, it’s a no brainer. There are three flavors to choose from—Chipotle Tomato, Garlic Olive Oil, and Ginger Scallion. It also cooks in about five minutes, so it’s a quick meal option.

Feed yourself and children in need.
Feed yourself and children in need. (Amazon/)

Chickapea’s delicious pastas are gluten free, vegan, and kosher—and every 100-gram serving boasts 23 grams of protein and 11 grams of fiber. The brand also gives back, as a B Corp that donates three cents from every package sold to feed students nutritious lunches. This six pack is perfect for a family pantry.

For an easy to prepare, filling meal.
For an easy to prepare, filling meal. (Amazon/)

Barilla is a well known pasta brand, with a range of both wheat and gluten-free pasta types. Their chickpea pasta is not only gluten-free and protein rich, but also free of common allergy causing ingredients like peanuts, thanks to being produced in a dedicated plant. It cooks in just 7-9 minutes, making it an easy, quick, and filling meal.

Good, clean eating.
Good, clean eating. (Amazon /)

Also free of gluten and other allergens, Tolerant’s chickpea pasta packs a ton of protein into a small package. Made from 100 percent organic chickpea flour, this pasta is a delicious tasting, healthy alternative.

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elty
706 days ago
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The best handheld leaf blowers for your home and yard

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Keep your yard tidy.
Keep your yard tidy. (Stephan Zabini via Unsplash/)

After a windy night, a snow storm, or a blitz of yard work, the amount of debris on your sidewalk, deck and lawn can be a huge task to contend with. You could grab a broom and chip away at the mess in a few hours, but why do that when you can get the same job done in mere minutes using a high-powered leaf blower? There are gas-powered, battery-powered, and plug-in electric options, but the best thing about leaf blowers is that they’re much easier to carry around and control than the caliber of their blowing power might suggest.

Here’s a list of our favorite leaf blowers currently available.

Portable blower in multiple colors.
Portable blower in multiple colors. (Amazon/)

This lightweight electric leaf blower from Sun Joe weighs only 4.4 pounds, but it blows air at a whopping 215 miles per hour thanks to its 10-amp, 12,000-rpm motor. Because it’s so light, it’ll spare your arms if you’re working on a longer cleaning job or tackling large areas like yards, parking lots, and play areas. When you’re ready to store it, the blowing chute can be removed completely to make this blower even more compact.

Low-emissions gas blowing power.
Low-emissions gas blowing power. (Amazon/)

This gas-powered Hitachi leaf blower packs a 22cc engine that blows out an air volume of 441 cubic feet per minute at roughly 170 miles per hour. The 17.6 ounce fuel tank is plenty enough for blowing snow, leaves, and yard work debris into piles for easy clean up. Plus the engine is designed to put out as low a level of emissions as possible, keeping you healthier and lowering environmental impact. It also comes with a seven-year warranty so you can put it through its paces without fear.

Tiny for cars and pets.
Tiny for cars and pets. (Amazon/)

This Kimo leaf blower is super portable and small, making it great for stowing in your trunk for easy car cleaning or as a pet hair blower for inside spaces. The battery charges fully in just 60 minutes and can run at full power for 20 minutes straight on a full charge. It has a vacuum hole on the side and you can move the blow tube to instantly transform it into a handheld vacuum that sends debris out the blower hole into a bag of your choice.

Blow away debris at 200 miles per hour.
Blow away debris at 200 miles per hour. (Amazon/)

If power is your primary concern, this Craftsman leaf blower packs more than enough punch to tackle huge cleaning jobs while remaining portable. It’s gas-powered, so there are no cords to worry about tripping over, and it blows out winds in excess of 200 miles per hour thanks to its 25cc two-cycle engine. The long, extended nozzle is equipped with an integrated scraper so you can get leaves and debris out of even the tightest spaces without a fight.

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elty
817 days ago
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HTTP still under attack

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Lots of incoming challenges on Twitter from people who think all my sites should be converted from HTTP to HTTPS.

They make three main points:

  • Google is going to warn people about my site being "not secure."
  • Something bad could happen to my pages in transit from a HTTP server to the user's web browser.
  • It's not hard to convert and it doesn't cost a lot.

I think that covers it. I list them here to prove I've been listening and understand what they say, so hopefully someone doesn't try to explain it to me yet again.

The second reason, something bad could happen -- well lots of bad things could happen. I can't afford to protect against all of them. I wonder if they ever think about the human being who is supposed to do the work? We have lives, and priorities, we must make choices about how we spend time. Maybe our websites aren't our number one priority? Even if they were, I would much rather develop new stuff than invest in protecting archives of blogs and old docs against hypothetical problems.

Nothing is going to happen to the pages themselves, btw -- they're worried about how people view the docs through their browser. If the web becomes so polluted with man-in-the-middle attacks, I can think of quicker workarounds. For example, I could send the reader a zipped archive of a website. That would be an easy place to add encryption. No need to transition all my sites. And if the problems never materialize, a possibility even Google must admit, we could make a new kind of web browser, that's another option. One which unlike Google's, will let you browse the full web, not just Google's limited idea of what the web is. I think this represents a good opportunity to get Google out of the way. If we get there it will be worth a try.

Re the third point, it's quick and easy -- it wouldn't be for me. I experimented for a few years with the idea that a domain could be the address of a document, or a shortened link. I have hundreds of such domains.

One more thing before I get to the point. Some of the people Google thinks are going to convert to HTTP have moved on. There's no one there to do the thing Google wants them to do. What then?

Why we must say no to Google

The first reason, above, is the most important one, by far. And the lack of thought and care on the part of Google illustrates exactly why it's so incredibly important.

The numbers they present are misleading, they talk about web traffic, not web sites. If you add up Amazon, Netflix, Wikipedia, Google, Wordpress, Facebook and a dozen more sites, I bet that's 99 percent of the traffic of the web. But that does not represent the size of the problem. Some sites get almost no traffic, yet the information they contain could be valuable to someone in the future. Does Google cite the wrong stat because they don't know how much of the web's content is served through HTTP? Or, more likely, they know and therefore understand how what they're trying to do, if they don't plan to leave anything behind, amounts to boiling the ocean. I don't see an alternative explanation.

Before the web, I spent a decade working on three corporate-owned platforms, the Apple II, IBM PC and Macintosh. I would say all companies tried reasonably hard to bring developers forward, most of the time, and for the most part I was able to make the transition. But, in all cases, I had a company behind me. Today I'm just one person. And in no case had I spent more than three years doing the work that required transitioning, so the job was relatively small by today's standards. Even so, given the short time, and the generally good intentions of the vendors, by the time we got to the Mac, they were already using breakage as a weapon against developers they didn't like, or who were occupying market segments they wanted to own.

Before the web, I couldn't see a way to be an independent developer, as long as there was a platform vendor who ultimately would decide whether or not I would be allowed to continue. But the web changed all that. And it's why I can point to an archive site for a tool I created in 1994 that still works. That's 24 years of compatibility. That's some kind of record in the tech world.

BTW, it's not my accomplishment, all I had to do was assure that the files stayed where they were. The accomplishment is the social agreement not to break things that we call the World Wide Web. It's like the Grand Canyon. It's a big natural thing, a resource, an inspiration, and like the canyon it deserves our protection.

So now Google points a gun at the web and says "Do as we say or we'll tell users your site is not secure." What they're saying doesn't stand up to a basic bullshit-test. There's nothing insecure about my site. Okay I suppose it's possible you could get hurt using it, I'll grant you that. But I could get hurt getting up out of my chair and going into the kitchen to refill my coffee cup. Life is insecure. When Google says my old site is insecure what they really mean is "This is our platform now, and you do as we say or your site won't work." I don't believe for a minute that Google's motivation is protecting users. They seem to believe they can confuse users (they can) and that means they can do anything to the web they like. I suppose they can do that too. But it doesn't mean the web will cooperate. Imho, it won't.

There was an old joke in the days of MS-DOS. A new version doesn't ship until Lotus 1-2-3 doesn't run. Probably wasn't true, but it did illustrate the extraordinary power Microsoft had over its then-chief competitor. This is the power Google thinks it has now over the web.

I'm not going back to corporate platforms. And I have to admit, I like this kind of fight. All my career I've had my sandcastles knocked over by small people at big companies who envy me for my freedom. The web got them out of the way. And I'm determined to keep it that way, or I'll just let them knock my sites off the air.

I saw Darkest Hour the other day. If you've seen it, you understand what I'm talking about. Even if I could convert the hundreds of domains I have on platforms that don't easily support HTTPS, even if it were just a matter of time, cost, volume of work, even if it were easy and quick as they say, I still wouldn't do it. I love the web. It gave me another 24 years as an independent software developer. What a gift. I'm not going to abandon it now. If this is where my 24-year run ends, so be it. There's no negotiating about this. Some things are absolute.

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elty
1632 days ago
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Thanks for the clarity.
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